mandag den 27. maj 2013

The Queen's Marble Staircase

The Queen's Marble Staircase is also known simply as the Marble Staircase. When you reach the top of the Marble Staircase you will enter the Queen's Guards' Room and thus enter her apartments. The staircase derives its name from the incredible amounts of marble that went into the building of the staircase. Beautifully gilded reliefs of bronze has been added above the doors - one of them is adorned with two sphinxes and dates back to 1681. Golden engravings continue all the way near the ceiling and includes the arms of France flanked by palm leaves and the iconic fleur-de-lis of the French monarchy. Red, white and black marble has been used to make out the foundation of the staircase. Occasionally pilasters are crowned with golden tops.

A large painting by Jean Belin, Blain de Fourtenay, Meusnier Philippe and Poerson Charles-François. Remarkably enough two false doors has been added to create the much sought after symmetry - both doors are made of glass. One of the main "attractions" of the room is the golden sculpture on the landing of the first floor. Two large intertwined L's adorns a shield topped with a crown and flanked by olive branches; the shield is carried by two cherubs. On the first floor three large windows illuminates the staircase.

When Versailles was stormed in 1789 the infuriated peasants ran up the Queen's Marble Staircase and gained access to the Queen's Guards' Room.
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